Naproxen Drug Safety

 

Association of Selective and Conventional Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drugs with Acute Renal Failure: A Population-based, Nested Case-Control Analysis

Verena Schneider

They identified 121,722 new NSAID users older than age 65 years from the administrative health care databases of Quebec, Canada, in 1999–2002.

Data for 4,228 cases and 84,540 controls matched on age and follow-up time were analyzed by using conditional logistic regression, adjusted for sex, age, health status, health care utilization measures, exposure to contrast agents, and nephrotoxic medications. The risk of acute renal failure for all NSAIDs combined was highest within 30 days of treatment initiation (adjusted rate ratio (RR) = 2.05, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.61, 2.60) and receded thereafter.

The association with acute renal failure within 30 days of therapy initiation was comparable for rofecoxib (RR = 2.31, 95% CI: 1.73, 3.08), naproxen (RR = 2.42, 95% CI: 1.52, 3.85), and nonselective, non-naproxen NSAIDs (RR = 2.30, 95% CI: 1.60, 3.32) but was borderline lower for celecoxib (RR =1.54, 95% CI: 1.14, 2.09; test for interaction comparing celecoxib with rofecoxib, p = 0.057). There was a significant association for both selective and nonselective NSAIDs with acute renal failure, but confirmatory studies are required.

 

 

Rare Stevens-Johnson syndrome can be unpredictable, deadly

By Avi Selk

Stevens-Johnson syndrome is the bomb in the pill bottle: an unpredictable drug reaction that makes your skin and internal-organ lining fall off. It can be triggered by almost any drug, preceded by the slightest malady -- a cold, a fingernail infection, a headache. Estimated to affect just a few people per million a year, the disease is so rare that a spokeswoman for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had to look it up on the Internet when queried. The Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Foundation in Colorado says it hears of at least three new cases in Texas each month.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news189889433.html#jCp
Stevens-Johnson syndrome is the bomb in the pill bottle: an unpredictable drug reaction that makes your skin and internal-organ lining fall off. It can be triggered by almost any drug, preceded by the slightest malady -- a cold, a fingernail infection, a headache. Estimated to affect just a few people per million a year, the disease is so rare that a spokeswoman for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had to look it up on the Internet when queried. The Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Foundation in Colorado says it hears of at least three new cases in Texas each month.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news189889433.html#jCp
Stevens-Johnson syndrome is the bomb in the pill bottle: an unpredictable drug reaction that makes your skin and internal-organ lining fall off. It can be triggered by almost any drug, preceded by the slightest malady -- a cold, a fingernail infection, a headache. Estimated to affect just a few people per million a year, the disease is so rare that a spokeswoman for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had to look it up on the Internet when queried. The Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Foundation in Colorado says it hears of at least three new cases in Texas each month.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news189889433.html#jCp
Stevens-Johnson syndrome is the bomb in the pill bottle: an unpredictable drug reaction that makes your skin and internal-organ lining fall off. It can be triggered by almost any drug, preceded by the slightest malady -- a cold, a fingernail infection, a headache. Estimated to affect just a few people per million a year, the disease is so rare that a spokeswoman for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had to look it up on the Internet when queried. The Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Foundation in Colorado says it hears of at least three new cases in Texas each month.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news189889433.html#jCp

Stevens-Johnson syndrome is the bomb in the pill bottle: an unpredictable drug reaction that makes your skin and internal-organ lining fall off.


It can be triggered by almost any drug, preceded by the slightest malady -- a cold, a fingernail infection, a headache.


Estimated to affect just a few people per million a year, the disease is so rare that a spokeswoman for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had to look it up on the Internet when queried.

The Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Foundation in Colorado says it hears of at least three new cases in Texas each month

Read more at: http://phys.org/news189889433.html#jCp

 

 

FDA receives hundreds of injury reports

The U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has received hundreds of injury reports concerning SJS / TEN and says that while SJS occurs twice as often in men, women with SJS are twice as likely to develop TENS – which is the most severe form of SJS.

Although prescription drugs, such as Allopurinol, can lead to the disease, over the counter (OTC) drugs can as well.

Some of these include non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs and Cox2 inhibitors, such as , Children’s Motrin, Celebrex, Ibuprofin, Advil, Aleve, and Aleve Cold & Sinus and commonly used antibiotics such as Amoxicillin, and Zithromax (commonly referred to as the Z-pack).